Kansas City Dangerous Drug Lawyer

Dangerous Drugs & Pharmaceutical Litigation

When we become ill or injured, we turn to doctors for support, guidance and healing. However, when a doctor prescribes a medication that has caused you to become even more ill or injured, where will you turn to get the support you really need? At Wendt Goss, P.C. our team of Missouri dangerous drug attorneys assists clients throughout Kansas City with dangerous drug claims, medical malpractice lawsuits and pharmaceutical and medical device cases.

If you or someone you love has been adversely affected by a dangerous prescription drug, do not hesitate to contact a Kansas City personal injury lawyer from our office at once. The sooner you involve legal representation, the sooner we will be able to put a sufficient case together on your behalf, consisting of physician reports, evidence from the dangerous drug and manufacturing companies and statements from expert witnesses. We understand that this will be a difficult time for you and your family, and we only intend to help you through this to allow you to move on to a full recovery.

How does the FDA regulate drugs?

Over-the-counter drugs, supplements and prescription-only drugs are all regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Prescription drugs must undergo the strictest review before release. Before a prescription drug is released to consumers/patients, they must go through a review process so that the FDA can determine whether they are safe for use. The FDA lists six steps in the regulation process for drug approval:

  1. Laboratory and/or animal testing: This shows drug manufacturers how their drug works and whether it is safe enough for human testing.
  2. Human clinical trials: After a drug manufacturer conducts lab tests and submits a New Drug Application (NDA), human clinical trials in three phases commence.
  3. Research data sent to CDER for review: Data from the lab testing and clinical trials is then sent to the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) for review by physicians, toxicologists, chemists and more.
  4. FDA approval: If the CDER's review is positive, the drug will be approved and released to patients and consumers.
  5. FDA post-release monitoring: The FDA will continue to monitor a drug after it has been released. They will review any reports of drug injury and concern from healthcare practitioners and patients.
  6. If health risks are detected, warnings or recalls are issued: If there is enough concern over the safety of a drug, the FDA will issue amended warnings and additional patient information. If the risk is severe enough, a drug can be recalled.

Who is at-fault in a dangerous drug case?

In the event that a patient is injured because of their use of a dangerous prescription drug, there are three major parties commonly held liable in these types of cases:

  • The drug manufacturer
  • The drug's marketing company (if different than the manufacturer)
  • The healthcare professional who prescribed the drug

Contact a Kansas City dangerous drug lawyer if you have questions about who you can hold liable in your drug injury case.

Call a Kansas City Personal Injury Attorney at Wendt Goss, P.C.

At our firm, we have extensive experience handling personal injury cases and understand the laws in place concerning dangerous drug situations, such as those involving Actos. We have handled similar claims in the past, and can use our past knowledge and experience to your benefit. Call our office today to take advantage of our free case evaluation. In some cases, when a drug has not undergone lengthy and proper testing but is put on the shelves anyways, many people are affected by the drug.

Without an FDA approval, a drug can be extremely dangerous and even lethal. To prevent this from occurring, ensure that all of your medications have gone through the necessary tests to prove that the drug is safe for use. Talk to your doctor about your prescriptions to learn more and please call a Kansas City dangerous drug attorney at our office to find out how you can be compensated if your medications have caused you harm.